Bedford County Documents

  CR/XIII/168  *{See legend below}
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 06 January, 1782

The Board taking into consideration the recruiting the Ranging companies in the counties of Bedford. Westmoreland and Washington.
     On consideration, Resolved, That a sum of two hundred and fifty pounds specie, be paid into the hands of David Espy, Esquire, and by him delivered to Lieutenant William Johnston and Ensign Hugh Means, for the purpose of recruiting the company of Rangers in the county of Bedford.

  CR/XIII/169
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 07 January, 1782

The Council taking into consideration the exposed situation of the frontiers counties, the probability of invasions of them by parties of Indians, and the impossibility of obtaining particular orders from the Council, for calling out in due time the militia of the said counties in such cases,
     Ordered, That the Lieutenants of the counties of Northampton, Northumberland, Bedford, Westmoreland and Washington, respectively, be authorized && empowered to call out such and so many militia, according to law, as they may judge necessary for repelling the enemy.

  CR/XIII/198
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 09 February, 1782

Ordered, That the Honorable John Piper, Esquire, Bernard Dougherty, George Ashman, James Martin, and Hugh Davison, Esquires, of the county of Bedford, be appointed and commissioned to try and determine, according to the laws and customs of this Commonwealth (Blank in Council book) now confined in the goal of the county of Bedford, charged with having (Blank in Council book).

  CR/XIII/203-204
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 23 February, 1782

Ordered, That Lieutenant Richard Johnston, now at Yorktown, be directed to march with his company to Bedford forthwith, and there put himself under the command of the Lieutenant of the county of Bedford, for the defence of the frontiers of the said county.
     Ordered, That the Lieutenant of the county of York be directed to call out one class of militia of the said county for the purpose of guarding the military prisoners in that county; that as forty men only are wanted at one time for the said purpose, the Lieutenant be directed to call out no more than that number, and that the battalions be called upon in their numerical order, beginning at the first, for the said one class, so far as may be necessary to furnish the said number, and when the time of service of the first forty shall expire, that he then call on the next battalion or battalions for a like number, so as to have the succeeding ready to take charge of the said prisoners when the time of the first shall expire, and so on until the said one class shall have served their tour of duty, or until further order from this Council.
     An order was drawn on the Treasurer in favor of the Honorable John Piper, Esquire, for the sum of sixty pounds specie, to be by him paid to Lieutenant Richard Johnston, for the purpose of paying the company of Rangers raised for the defence of the county of Bedford, for which the said Lieutenant Johnston is to account.

  CR/XIII/209-210
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 01 March, 1782

The Council considering the great importance of preserving a force of the frontiers for the protection of the inhabitants, were of opinion that measures should be immediately taken for satisfying the said troops; and thereupon,
     Ordered, That Mr. Vice President, Mr. Hayes, Mr. Pentecoast and Doctor Gardner, be a committee for conferring with a committee of the General Assembly, on the situation of the frontier defence, if the Honorable House shall think proper to appoint such a committee.
     On consideration, Ordered, That the Lieutenant of the county of Cumberland be directed to call out one company of militia, for the defence of the frontiers of the county of Bedford, so as to be on duty by the first of next month.

  CR/XIII/213
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 05 March, 1782

Ordered, That Captain Joseph Stiles, Commissary of Military Stores, be directed to deliver three thousand flints, one hundred and fifty stand of arms, and the like number of pouches, in the following proportions, vizt:
     To the Honorable John Piper, Esquire, one thousand flints, fifty stand of arms, and fifty pouches, to be forwarded to the Lieutenant of the county of Bedford, for the use of the ranging company raised in the said county.
     Ordered, That the deficiency of powder directed to be sent to the said counties on the ninteenth of December last, he now delivered as aforesaid, in cartridges, made up and fitted to the said muskets, for the use of the said companies.

  CR/XIII/213
          Letter from Abraham Smith to Pres. Moore, 15 March, 1782

Sir, I have this day Received an order of Council Directing me to call one Company of Militia for the Defence of Bedford County. I would beg liberty to represent to your Excellency and Council the Difficulties we labour under in sending Militia to the frontiers; we have not any ammunition in this County belonging to the Publick, nor do I think men could be found in Provisions, as there is no Commissarys Stores where it would be any way Convenient for that purpose; neither are we in a situation to purchase at ihis time, (were we even sure to get it allowed in our accounts,) as little can De done without hard money, and we have none of that, nor are we able to get much of it Collected, as it is an article very Scarce in this County; the most part of the people lyable to pay fines are very poor, and when they go to Bedford County I know of no way fixed to get Provisions. The Battalion from this County that served there last fall were frequently likely to suffer, and the Lieutenant of that County was under the necessity of Discharging them two or three weeks before their times were up because they Could not be Provided for. I assure your Excellency that such is our Situation at this time. Some ammunition is absolutely necessary, as our men will never march without it. I had grate Difficulty to procure a very small allowance for them the last time they marched. I very sensibly feel for the Distresses of the frontiers, yet I can never be of the oppinion that a few men sent to them mountains is of much service.
     I waite your Excellency's further orders and Direction, and nothing shall be wanting on my part that is in my power to Carry them into execution.
     I am your Exellency's most obedient and very Hum'e Servt., AB'M SMITH.

  CR/XIII/257
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 12 April, 1782

Mr. Dougherty, Mr. M'Lene and Mr. Wynkoop, a committee of the General Assembly, attended in Council and requested a conference with the Council respecting sundry class-men raised in the county of Bedford in the year 1781; and thereupon, a conference was had, and after some time spent therein, it was agreed that the said class-men be joined to the Ranging company raised in the said county, to serve during the term of their enlistment, and the committee was requested to report the same to the House of Assembly.

  CR/XIII/263
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 15 April, 1782

Charles Cessna, Esquire, late Commissioner of Purchases in the county of Bedford, having represented that there is remaining in his hands a quantity of flour and forage purchased agreeably to act of Assembly passed the twenty-third day of March, 1780, entitled "An Act for procuring a supply of provisions and other necessaries for the use of the army, which articles are in danger of great waste.
     On consideration, Ordered, That the said Charles Cessna be directed to sell the aforesaid articles as soon as may be, and pay the money arising therefrom into the hands of the Treasurer of this State.

  CR/XIII/265
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 17 April, 1782

An order was drawn on the Treasurer in favor of Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, for the sum of one hundred pounds specie, in part of the contract for supplying the troops stationed in the county of Bedford with provisions, for which he is to account.

  1/IX/529
          Letter from William Brown to the Supreme Executive Council, 17 April, 1782

As you have ordered two Companys of Militia to Guard the frontiers of Cumberland County and a part of these Companys Must Ly in Bedford and the other in Northumberland Countys, I will find them in Rations at the same Rate they are found in Bedford County, as I have to Carry said provisions over three Large Mountains on Horse Back I cannot do it for Less.

  1/IX/539
          Letter from Bernard Dougherty to Pres. Moore, 07 May, 1782

Sir, I Beg leave to inform your Excellency that I have learned to Day that a Number of Cumberland Militia are ordered for the Garrison of Frankston, and others are appointed for different stations on the Frontiers of this County, a Quantity of Provisions will of course be wanted, your Excellency has still under your Eye the numbers of those who are already sent, and will from Time to Time have the ordering of such as may be appointed. I beg we may be enabled to furnish the necessary Supplies that may be wanted on so important and interesting an affair as the Defence of the County, the little Money we have got is almost expended, and Beef, Mutton and Pork are so scarce here that we cannot get them even for Money; but nothing can be had for Credit.
     We therefore beg that your Honorable Board will please to have the Distress of our present Situation in full view, and send us what may be deemed adequate to furnish what will be wanted, and take such opportunity in sending the Money as will offer, for some Times a considerable Time elapses without a single Person passing down. Either Mr. Wood, of this Town, or Mr. Duncan, of Pitt, will afford an Opportunity by whom Money may be sent, or if any opportunity shou'd offer to send to the Standing Stone Settlement, a part might be sent there, as Provisions will be wanted at that Place, Mr. Cessney is now out endeavouring to get Provisions; If we are enabled no effort of ours shall be wanted to render effective the Supplies granted for the Defence of this Frontier.
     I am, Sir, with very great respect, your Excellency's most obedt and very Hble Servt, BARNARD DOUGHERTY.

  1/IX/543
          Letter from Bernard Dougherty to Pres. Moore, 13 May, 1782

Sir, I beg leave to inform your Excellency that a Company of Cumberland Militia, Consisting of thirty five Men, arrived here yesterday on their way to Frankston Garrison, where they are to be joined by Capt. Boyd's Ranging Company, the People in the Frontiers of this County are mostly fled from their Habitations; also it is strongly rumoured here that depredations have been Committed in Penn's Valley, and that upwards of twenty of the Militia have fallen; as yet nothing material has happened in this County, but we are afraid a stroke will be made next Moon Light: I am under the necessity of letting your Excellency and the Hon'ble Board of Council know that I have laid out the little Money I received, and have not any more to purchase with, and that there's nothing to be had without Money, Credit has no chance, and exorbitant prices are demanded for Bacon (the only species of provisions to be had) even a shilling and fifteen pence [Per] lb. ready money, and unless such can be had it will have a dire effect on the Frontiers, as thereby the little Garrison we have will be evacuated.
     Sir, it gives me pain that I am obliged to write in this stile, and so pressingly, but I am of Opinion that it is my Duty to do so, and if possible, to point out the impending Ruin the want of Money (and that immediately) will have on the Inhabitants of this County; no Endeavours of mine shall be wanting in answering the Expectations of Council, provided I am enabled to purchase the Provisions that will be wanted.
     The Bearer, Mr. Armitage, will afford an opportunity of having Money sent as far as this Town, directed to the Care of Mr. Michael Cryder, who will account to me for what will be sent to him; and a good opportunity will by Mr. Duncan or Mr. Woods offer for Bedford; I am ordered by the County Lieut, to lay in two Months Provisions for one hundred and fifty Men at Frankston, exclusive of two other small Posts which are in Contemplation of being garrisoned on the Frontiers of this County, therefore your honorable Board will be greatly competent to know the sum that will be necessary. I shall not neglect to give such Intelligence as may in my way to the Honorable Board.
     I am, Sir, with very great respect, your Excellency's most obedt servt, BARNARD DOUGHERTY. Huntington, or the Standing [Stone] Town, May 13th, 1782.

  1/IX/546-547
          Letter from Benard Dougherty to Pres. Moore, 18 May, 1782

Sir, I have wrote to your Excellency of the 13th Inst. from the Standing Stone Town. The purport of which was the absolute necessity, there is of Money being sent into this County immediately, for otherwise the Garrison at Frankston must inevitably be evacuated, there will be Ninety at that place on 21st, Inst. and having laid out what little Money was advanced for Provisions, not a single pound of any sort can be had without Money, and was there Provisions enough, the very Carriage (being about forty Miles over Hills and Mountains) could not be had without Money, another party of one Company is to be stationed at the Heads of Dunning's Creek, and another at Colo. Piper's, and the whole of the Provisions is to be carried. Nothing in my Power shall be wanting for the safety of the Inhabitants, if I am enabled to purchase the necessaryProvisions to keep the different Garrisons together; and if your Excellency and the Honorable Board will think proper I will chearfully and heartly give up my part of any profits that may arise on the Contracts, so as you will inable us to answer your expectations. I hope this will be done, nay I earnestly beg and pray it may be done, otherwise the Defence intended for our County will prove abortive.
     On my way from the Standing Stone, I met Sundry Persons who came from the Monongohala and Washington County, all of them agree in reporting, that a party consisting of upwards of six hundred Voluntiers are going against Sanduskey and are to meet tomorrow at Mingo Bottom in order to Cross the River on their way to that place.
     Those of the Militia who don't go themselves it is said Contribute towards Horses and provisions to those who go, and thereby divides the Burthen and Expence, with the Voluntiers; one of my Informants hinted as much as that there was a probability of a thousand Men going on this Expedition.
     Sir I am under the necessity of mentioning to your Excellency again that unless money arrives here in Time this Country is undone.
     I am Sir with the greatest Respect, your Excellency's most obedt. Hble. Servt. BENARD DOUGHERTY.

  CR/XIII/298-299
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 05 June, 1782

The following orders were drawn on the Treasurer, vizt:
     In favor of Charles cessna, Esquire, for the sum of one hundred pounds, State money of the seventh of April, 1781, being extra allowance for his services as Commissioner of Purchase in the county of Bedford.
     In favor of Charles Cessna, for the sum of one hundred pounds specie to be by him delivered to Messrs. Cessna and Dougherty, contractors for supplying with provisions the Ranging company and militia in actual service in the county of Bedford, for which the said contractors are to account.

  CR/XIII/301
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 11 June, 1782

Mr. Gideon Ritchey, one of the Agents of Forfeited Estates for the county of Bedford, made the return of the sale of a certain tract of land in the county of Bedford, containing about eighteen hundred acres, divided into two tracts, the one containing fourteen hundred and ninety-five acres, sold to James Woods, of the county of Cumberland, for the sum of two thousand and five pounds. The other containing three hundred and twenty-five acres, sold to the said James Woods, for the sum of one hundred and seventy pounds, and certifying the payment of the said purchase monies in officers certificates. He also informed the Council that the said James Woods was now attending, and requested a title may he granted to him for the same.
     The Council recurring to the proclamation dated March the twentieth, 1781, on which the attaint of Harry Gordon, and the seizure of the said tract of land, is said to be founded, observe: that Henry Gordon is there called upon to render himself and abide his trial, &ca., and that the said lands have been sold as late the property of Harry Gordon, were unanimously of opinion that the seizure and sale of the said tract of land is void and of none effect; whereupon,
     Ordered, That Gideon Ritchey he directed to return the said sum of two thousand and five pounds, and one hundred and seventy pounds, to the said James Woods, in like certificates with those received by him in payment thereof.

  CR/XIII/302
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 13 June, 1782

An order was drawn on the Treasurer in favor of Gideon Ritchey, and Michael cryder, Esquires, Agents of Forfeited Estates in the county of Bedford, for the sum of thirty-two pounds seventeen shillings and three pence specie, balance of their account dated the twelfth instant.

  1/IX/554
          Letter from Bernard Dougherty to Pres. Moore, 13 June, 1782

Sir, This Day I have been honored with your Excellency's Letter of the 5th Inst., and having wrote yesterday concerning the distressed situation of our County, (tho' still I had some hopes that by Mr. Cessna some relief wou'd be afforded) I have no more to say, seeing every avenue capable of alleviating our distresses is closed.
     The order Mr. Cessna has on the Treasurer stands in no stead, having not a penny; I am the Treasurer and Mr. Cessna has no doubt informed the Honorable Board of my being so; and cou'd I likewise inform that I had no Money; and cou'd this order be paid it wou'd go but a short way where there are near two hundred red Men to victuall, I cannot go to the standing stone for the returns of the Provisions issued there, untill I obtain Money for to pay for what was received, and therefore cannot send the returns of the Issuings yet; but for the Information of Council I believe there are about ten thousand Rations already Issued, and how far one hundred and seventy-five Pounds wou'd go in payment of so much provisions, your Excellency (who is extremely well acquainted with Business,) will see at first view. Bacon (which must be had for scouting parties,) cannot be had for less than ten pence, and some will have twelve pence, (at least) thirty Miles distance from this Town, the Carriage from where it is bought, and again to the Different Stations makes this Article come high as does every other.
     This goes by express hired by Colo. Piper and myself, and have been obliged to borrow as much Money as will barely carry him down and up again, untill he returns I will do every Thing in my power to keep the stations together, and if possible prevent the People from flying; I am sure I need not mention any more the necessity of our settlement, I now pray that the Express may not be detained for one single Day's delay may prove fatal to the whole county, to Col. Piper I refer for further Information, and shall give such News as are going; Captain William McCall with a scouting party of the Militia on Duty in the Invirons of this Town, set off for Frankston last Saturday, and it seems were discovered by Indians within ten Miles of that place, late in the evening of the Sunday following, our people betook themselves to the Mountain and having travelled all night, got in to that Garrison on Monday morning by break of Day, and on their return they saw where the Indians took their way into the Inhabitants, Those are thought by the most Intelligent People, to be spies belonging to a large party who may make a Descent into the Inhabitance some Time this Moon.
     I am Sir, with all due respect your Excellency's most obedt servt, BARNARD DOUGHERTY. June 13th, 1782.
     P. S. This Express was one of the Scout with Cap. McCall, we have Confidence in him and are satisfied he will be careful in bringing up whatever Money will be sent by the Honourable Council.

  CR/XIII/309
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 18 June, 1782

An order was drawn on the Treasurer in favor of Daniel Rhoads, Esquire, for the sum of one hundred pounds specie, to be by him paid to Bernard Dougherty and Charles Cessna, Esquires, of Bedford county, in part of their contract for supplying the company of Rangers and militia stationed in the said county, for which they are to account.

  CR/XIII/331
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 12 July, 1782

Ordered, That the Lieutenant of the counties of Northampton, Northumberland, Bedford, Westmoreland and Washington, be directed not to call out a greater number than one hundred militia at any one time, for the defence of the frontiers of their respective counties, but by special order of this Board.

  CR/XIII/349
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 14 August, 1782

Ordered, That the Lieutenants of the respective counties of Cumberland, Berks, Northampton, Northumberland, York, Bedford, Westmoreland, and Washington, respectively, be directed to make out and return to this Board, pay rolls of monies due to the militia of the said counties respectively, with the proper vouchers for the same.

  1/IX/619-620  Also History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties, Pennsylvania, p 97
          Letter from Barnard Dougherty to William Moore, President of the Supreme Executive Council, 19 August, 1782

I beg leave to lay before your Excellency and the Honorable Council, the present Situation of the County of Bedford: On the 8th, of this Inst., were found killed and scalped about eighteen Miles on this side of the Town of Bedford, and within half a Mile of the great Road one Peck, his wife and two children, his house burnt, and another who lived there is missing and thought to be taken away. The Enemy penetrating so far into the very heart of the country has struck a general panick, and the People are mostly fled, On my coming down I had occasion to pass thro' the settlements of Brush Creek, Tonolowas, Licking Creek and the Big Cove, and most of the people are either gathered at different places, gone, or going away into Maryland, Virginia or Conegocheague, however, on my crossing Tuscarora Mountain leading from the Coves to Conegocheague, I met several families returning into the Coves.
     I would likewise inform your Excellency that there are several Stations occupied at present in the County of Bedford, by the Bedford Pennsylvania Company of Rangers, and the Bedford County Militia, to wit, Frankstown, Heads of Dunning's Creek, Fort Piper, the Town and Environs of Bedford, along the River Juniata, and some other inconsiderable small parties at other Stations, in all about one hundred and fifty or one hundred and sixty men; that there is not above one week's provisions for their subsistence, and, that it was not possible for me to have got more, having not a penny to purchase with, and if there is not a speedy supply sent to those stations, they will, of Course, be evacuated, and as sure as Frankstown, Fort Piper, Dunning's Creek posts, or any one of them are evacuated, I am of Opinion Cumberland County will become the Frontier, because these are the most Material stations in the County, and if it is heard once that any of them are deserted, the whole of the Country to which they are a frontier will immediately fly:
     The other Frontier Counties are equally distressed by every report that I can hear.
     I had almost forgot informing your Excellency that the notorious Girty has for some years past threatened the Town of Bedford with destruction, in like manner as he has that of Hanna's Town, he has effected his design on the latter, and how soon he may effect a similar Destruction on the former, I know not, but I am equally afraid he has it in Contemplation; This Information I thought myself under an absolute necessity of giving to your Honorable Board.

  CR/XIII/354-355
          Notes of the Supreme Executive Council, 23 & 24 August, 1782

An order was drawn on the Treasurer in favor of the Honorable Thomas Smith, Esquire, for his pay in full till the twentieth day of July last, as a delegate in Congress for this State, vizt: For one hundred and thirty-six pounds ten shillings specie.
     Mr. Magoffin, Mr. Dougherty, Mr. Maclay, Mr. William Montgomery and Mr. William Cooke, a committee of the General Assembly, attended in Council, delivered an order of the House dated the twenty-third instant, which was read, by which it appears that the said committee are directed to confer with a committee of the Supreme Executive Council, and with a committee of the Honorable Congress, on the present critical situation of affairs on the frontiers; Whereupon, the Vice President and Mr. Byers were appointed a committee to confer thereon accordingly, to meet this evening at five o'clock, in the Council Chamber.

  CR/XIII/359
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 02 September, 1782

On consideration of the proposals of Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, for supplying the Ranging company and militia which may be employed in the county of Bedford for the defence of the frontiers;
      Ordered, That twelve pence per ration be allowed for the first day of March last, so long as the said troops shall keep the field. The ration to consist of One pound of bread. One pound of beef, or 3/4 lb of pork. One jilt of whiskey per day, and One quart of salt, and Two quarts of vinegar } to every hundred rations. Eight pounds of soap, and Three pounds of candles, } to every seven hundred rations.
      The rations to he delivered at such places as the said troops may from time to time be stationed within the county of Bedford.
      Ordered, That the said contractor do furnish rations to Captain Boyd's company, and others actually employed, and bearing arms for the defence of the frontiers, agreeably to a muster roll, signed by Captain Boyd and countersigned by the Lieutenant, or any one of the Sub-Lieutenants of the said county, monthly, and to no other persons whatever; that he furnish no back rations of any kind or to any persons.

  1/XI/628
          Letter from Barnard Dougherty to Dr. Gardner, 02 September, 1782

I Beg leave to lay the inclosed thro' your means before the Honorable Board of Council, as it gives (tho' imperfectly) some acct of the present Situation of the County of Bedford, you were kind enough to promise to me a Copy of such instructions as are necessary for me to observe relative to Issuing Provisions, I pray it may be remembered with respect to signing Vouchers, that the County Lieutenant lives upwards of fifty Miles from Bedford Town. I understand that the Loan for the relief of the Frontiers is in such forwardness as not to admitt of the least Doubt respecting it; if Council will please to take the county of Bedford into Consideration by enabling me to return to it immediately, I believe it would have a salutary effect, nothing can be more distressing that the present situation of it, for the places said in the inclosed to be broken up, are nearly on the Maryland Line, you will greatly lessen my Anxiety by letting me know what I am to expect, and it will add to my obligations that I may he as soon as Conveniently possible informed.

  CR/XIII/367-368
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 13 September, 1782

A return of Justices in Sherley township, in the county of Bedford, was received and read, by which it appears that Robert Cluggage and Matthew Patton were duly and fairly elected Justices for the said township; the Council took the same into consideration; and thereupon,
      Ordered, That Robert Cluggage, Esq'r, be appointed a Justice of the Peace in and for the county of Bedford, and commissioned accordingly.

  CR/XIII/374
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 20 September, 1782

Ordered, That Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, be authorized to furnish rations to the militia ordered from the counties of York and Cumberland to Fort Pitt, both on their march to the Fort and on their return home from thence; that the price for the rations be the same as agreed upon in the former contract.

  CR/XIII/374
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 20 September, 1782

The Council having taken their arrangements for supplying the troops on the expedition into the indian country, agreeably to Mr. Morris's proposition,
     Ordered, That Lieutenant Johnston march from Bedford county, and put himself under the command of Major General Irvine.

  CR/XIII/376-377
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 23 September, 1782

The following orders were drawn on the Treasurer, vizt:
     In favor of Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, for one hundred pounds, in one month from the date hereof, in part of his contract for supplying the Rangers and militia, stationed in Bedford county for defence of the frontiers with provisions, for which he is to account.
     In favor of the said Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, for one hundred pounds specie, in two months from the date hereof, in part of said contract, for which he is to account.
     In favor of said Bernard Dougherty, for three hundred pounds specie, in three months from the date herof, in part of the said contract, for which he is to account.

  CR/XIII/380-381
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 29 September, 1782

A letter from his Excellency General Washington, dated the twenty-third instant, expressing his opinion that it is best to decline the expeditions into the Indian country, was received and read; and thereupon,
     Ordered, That the expeditions into the Indian country be declined, and that orders be accordingly issued to the Commissioners for purchasing of provisions and hiring of horses.
     Ordered, That the same be communicated to Major General Potter.
     Ordered, That the march of Captain Shrawder's company of Rangers from Northampton county, be countermanded, and that the march of Lieutenant Johnston's company from Bedford county be also countermanded, the expeditions into the Indian country being laid aside.
     Ordered, That the order of this day to Colonel William Henry, for calling into service one subaltern, one serjeant, one corporal, and fifteen privates, be countermanded.
     Ordered, That the militia of the counties of Lancaster, York, and Berks, called into service on the ninth instant, for guarding the British prisoners in the said counties, be discharged as soon as the Continental troops shall return to that duty.
     Ordered, That the Lieutenants of the counties of Northampton, Berks, Cumberland, York, Northumberland, Bedford, Westmoreland and Washington, be directed to call out no more militia after the expiration of the time of those now in service, his Excellency General Washington haveing received intelligence that the British have called in all the savages, and that no more parties are to be permitted to be sent cut against the frontiers.

  1/IX/646-647
          Letter from Thomas Scott to Pres. Moore, 04 October, 1782

Dr Sir, Parties and prejudices run so high in this County, that I find it exceedingly difficult to keep things in any moderate bounds. There is a most unhappy disention between a part of the Court and a Great majority of the people, particularly the Gentleman first named in the Commission seems to be the aversion of a very great number, and it's almost Invariably the Case, that the Court and Jury are of a different opinion. I must confess, tho' with regrate, this Gentm discovers a disposition Rather Irritating, for the circumstances of this county, which extends so far as to render it difficult for other officers of the court to do the duties incumbant, without Incuring the displeasure of one party or other.
     For these reasons I could wish that a Gent was at the Head of the Commission, who was Less disagreeable to the people, and for this purpose Have, with others, friends of this Government, often thought of requesting Council to appoint a president to this court, according to the direction of the act of assembly in that case; but allass, I must confess our commission does not afford one who is in any great degree distinguished for qualifications of this kind. However, there is a Mr James Edgar, somewhat known in Philadelphia, having served some time in both Council and assembly, for York County, and Last year in assembly for this County; who was originally on the return for Justice for Smith's Township, in this county, together with a certain Mr Johnson, which Last Hap'ned to be commissioned, being Highest in voats, and that Circumstance not properly adverted to when the returns were sent off.
     Mr. Edgar you know, at least the old members of Council and Coll Matlack do; and as far as my opinion is of weight, I assure Council he is vastly superior to any in our commission, and such a man as I think would Give prety General Satisfaction, could he be put at the Head of the commission.
     Council have, in some instances, commissioned both those named in the return, and I think they will see equal necessity in this case. I would be very Hapy, & believe the people would be very thankfull, would Council please to do it, and I am persuaded the county would Reap real Benefit from this circumstance. I think the present president in Bedford was appointed on some Ground of Necessity, perhaps not Exceeding those mentioned.
     Inclosed is a return for Cumberland Township, the magistrate of that Township having been thrown into a new one Called Green's, by a division which I formerly mentioned.
     Give me Leave to Hope for those Commissions by the bearer Hereof, who will stay in town two or three days.
     I Have the Honour to be Your Excellencies and the Council's most obedt. and very Humble Servt., THO. SCOTT.

  CR/XIII/388-389
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 08 October, 1782

A return of Justices for Bedford township, in the county of Bedford, was received and read, by which it appears that William Proctor and George Wireraver were duly elected Justices for said township; whereupon,
     Resolved, That William Proctor be appointed a Justice of the Peace for the county of Bedford, and that he be commissioned accordingly.

  CR/XIII/399
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 19 October, 1782

The following orders were drawn on the Treasurer, vizt:
     In favor of Daniel Roberdeau, Esq'r, for seventy-three pounds one shilling and three pence specie, amount of his account for lead furnished by him in the year 1779, for the defence of the frontiers of this State, as settled 19th August, 1782.

  CR/XIII/400
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 21 October, 1782

A return of Justices for the township of Colerain, in the county of Bedford, was received and read, by which it appears that John Cessna and Abraham Miley were duly elected Justices for the said township; whereupon,
      Ordered, That John Cessna, Esquire, be appointed a Justice of the Peace for the said county of Bedford, and that he be commissioned accordingly.
     The return of the general election for the county of Bedford was now received and read, by which it appears that the following gentlemen were duly elected, vizt:
     Representatives. Charles Cessna, and George Woods. Sheriffs. Abraham Miley & Thomas Hays. Coroners. John Wilt & Samuel Davidson.
     On consideration, Ordered, that Abraham Miley he appointed Sheriff of the county of Bedford, and that John Wilt be appointed Coroner of the said county, and that they be commissioned accordingly.
     Abraham Miley, Esquire, Sheriff elect for the county of Bedford, now offers Charles Cessna and John Cessna, Esquires, of the said county, as sureties for the faithful discharge of the duties of his office of Sheriff of the said county, according to law, which the Council approve.

  CR/XIII/423
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 13 November, 1782

The following orders were drawn on the Treasurer, vizt:
      In favor of Charles Cessna, Esquire, for two hundred and eighty-three pounds specie, to he applied in paying to Lieut. Johnston's company of Rangers in Bedford county, two month's pay, to be paid out of the said five thousand pounds, for which the said Charles Cessna is to account.

  CR/XIII/426-428
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 15 November, 1782

The Council resumed the consideration of the request of the General Assembly of the eleventh instant, respecting the disposal of the five thousand pounds appropriated by the late House for the defence of the frontiers, and it appears that the following orders have been drawn, vizt:
     In favor of Charles Cessna, for paying two month's pay to Bedford county company of Rangers, said Cessna to account - 283.
     It appears by return, that Captain Schrawder's company consists of one Captain or Lieutenant, two Serjeants, two Corporals and thirty-one privates; that it appears by a report of Charles Cessna, Esquire, Captain Boyd's company consists of one Captain, (prisoner), one Lieutenant, one Ensign, two Serjeants, two Corporals, and forty-five privates...

  CR/XIII/446
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 09 December, 1782

A return of Justices for the county of Bedford was received and read, by which it appears that Bernard Dougherty and Henry Wertz were duly elected.
     On consideration, Ordered, That Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, be appointed a Justice of the Peace in the county of Bedford, and commissioned accordingly.
     On consideration, Ordered, That Bernard Dougherty, Esquire, be appointed President of the courts of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace and Common Pleas and Orphans' Court of the county of Bedford, and that he be commissioned accordingly.

  CR/XIII/448
          Note of the Supreme Executive Council, 11 December, 1782

An order was drawn on the Treasurer in favor of the Honorable John Piper, Esq'r, to be by him paid to Thomas Cummins, for carriage of cloathing for Captain Boyd's company of Rangers, from Philadelphia to Shippensburgh.

 

* A-: American Archives, Series -; JC: Journals of the Continental Congress; CR: Colonial Records; 1: PA Archives, First Series; 2: PA Archives, Second Series; etc; / Volume / Page(s)